Search

Author Message
jennyandfriends
jennyandfriends
Offline
My cat is too shy and scared! What can I do?
We have brought a new cat into our home. He is a 30lb. black ragdoll. I think he has been very abused. He stayes in hiding all of the time. If he does come out and he sees us he runs away. He never makes a sound. The only way I even know he is here is when food is gone from his dish and his offerings in the litter pan.I want to help him, but I don't know how! He is fixed and in good health. Can someone please help me?
Post : 1
5/27/2009 2:07:56 PM Reply To Post
BooCat
BooCat
Offline
RE: My cat is too shy and scared! What can I do?
I’m assuming that he’s an only cat and that you adopted him. With working at my local SPCA, I’ve noticed that physically abused cats normally show aggression more times than not. While a cat that has been left to themselves, shows little desire to be sociable. In both cases, I’ve found they’ll come around with the right conditions. If you have children in your house, he could be spooked with loud noises or their running around; you know, normal kid stuff. If this is the case, try explaining to them that the kitty feels afraid and they need to do their best not to make a lot of noise while in the house for awhile. Explain that he’ll start to be everyone’s kitty and they can also help once he’s accepted you.

If you find that he’s slinking off to one spot, try making this his spot. Add an old blanket and some toys, so he knows this is his area. Start by only talking to him with a soft voice in this area. I’ve found it best if you can get down to his level. Meaning, lye down so you don’t appear to be larger than he is. If he’s found a spot behind a piece of furniture, pull it out enough so he feels it’s still a place of comfort, but enough where you can have contact with him. Don’t keep pulling the furniture in and out, as he’ll get spooked with it being moved all the time. After a week or two of softly talking to him, you can start extending your hand every so often. Let him get accustomed to it before you attempt petting or scratching him. Where you’re letting him smell you before you try going further. He may swat at you from time to time, but this is to let you know this is his perimeter and he’s not ready to go further. Once he accepts your smells, he’ll allow you to start petting/scratching him. He’s now associated that you’re not a threat and that you’re someone he can trust. Keep this up for another week or two and start to play with him too. You should then find that he’ll accept you up close. I normally try snuggling my head with them at this point. If he swats at you, give it some more time. Most cats associate rubbing their face and body with showing affection to you. So this should signal that he’s become comfortable with you

You can now try coaxing him out with a string toy. Even though he comes out to play, don’t take away his comfort zone just yet. Keep doing this, but also allow him to venture out when he wants. Whatever you do, don’t place his food and water in this area; it’ll give him a reason to not want anything else. Once you find that he’ll come out while you’re doing other things, let him come to you. He’s probably going to want to venture around first, becoming familiar with everything else. Once he’s done this, you can now tell the children that they can help. However, you have to make sure that they understand that they need to do the same things you did. Understand that all of this can take quite awhile, but you should find that you have the kitty you were expecting.

The big thing is to let him decide on when and whom he feels comfortable with. As I found with one of my adopted cats; who had similar issues;, she took to my son above all else. Where she became his pillow and would lick his hair as he fell asleep. Sometimes, because children are smaller, they appear to be the least ominous. Hope this helps.
Post : 1
6/1/2009 11:42:35 PM Reply To Post